Genocide of Muslims in Myanmar

Pakistan, though belatedly, has also expressed grave concern over the genocidal persecution of the Muslims in Myanmar. To what extent the Muslim world, including our own country, can help the Rohingyas is still to be seen

The world we live in was supposed to be civilized with no space for barbarianism. We thought ethics and respect for humanity would reign supreme in the 21st century. Alas! The fate of the majority of the world’s population, in particular minorities, still hangs in oblivion. They are treated like slaves, killed without any evidence and annihilated for nothing. From South Africa and the Middle East to East Europe and Indonesia, minorities of all sorts have been abysmally subjected to sheer hatred, socio-economic oppression, mental torture, physical abuse and ultimately genocidal annihilation. The most recent case, in this respect, which has been appearing on social media, is of Myanmar (Burma) where the Rohingya, a Muslim minority, have witnessed the worst kind of genocidal operation at the hands of extremist Buddhists.


This massacre movement for the eradication of the Rohingya has been taking place in Myanmar since 2011. The former is a Muslim racial minority living in the Arakan state of western Burma. They have been facing severe maltreatment and oppression by the state and national regimes for decades. There are around 1.33 million Rohingya living in Burma but the Burmese state’s 1982 Citizenship Law refutes their basic right of citizenship in spite of the fact that the Rohingya people have been living in Burma for ages. More importantly, the president of Burma, Thein Sein, clearly denies the presence of the Rohingya as an ethnic group of Burma, labelling them Bengalis, which is historically incorrect since the Rohingya community has been residing in the northerwestern part of today’s Myanmar since pre-colonial times. The British consolidated their residential status as farm labourers in the 16th century. Hence, to argue that the Rohingyas are illegal migrants from Bangladesh is a conscious distortion of historical facts.


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Pakistan has made impressive progress in poverty alleviation: World Bank

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has made impressive progress in reducing absolute poverty and improving shared prosperity, according to World Bank (WB) report.
The percentage of the population below the national poverty rate has fallen from 34.7 percent in financial year 2002 to an estimated 13.6 percent in financial year 2011, according to Pakistan Country Programme Snapshot report published by the Bank.
The reports said, the country has already achieved the fist Millennium
Development Goal (MDG) by more than having the proportion of people whose income was less than $1.25 a day between 1991 and 2011.
Furthermore, growth in the real per capital consumption of the bottom
40 percent was a respectable 3.1 percent between 2002 and 2011, it added.
Poverty reduction has been strongest in the traditionally poorer provinces of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh, where poverty rates are now indistinguishable from those in Punjab.
However, the report said poverty remained much more prevalent in Balochistan, where a sizeable portion of residents were nomadic and were living in remote and conflict-affected areas.
According to the report, despite this progress, a large portion of the population remains vulnerable to falling back into poverty.
Although Pakistan’s recent gains in poverty were repaid, they remain fragile, in part because many households remain clustered near the poverty line.
An estimated 23 million people or 13 percent of the population, live on an amount between $1.25 and $1.50 per day, meaning that small reductions in consumption can greatly increase poverty rates.
However, according to report the poverty measurement remains controversial in Pakistan and urges for future efforts are needed to improve poverty monitoring and policy evaluation.
It said, poverty measurement can be institutionalised, in part through more independent and regularised poverty assessments, linking poverty measurements to other human development indicator data base and the establishment of a constructive partnership between official authorities, donors and academics to promote high-quality and timely measurement of poverty and shared prosperity, analysis and programme evaluation.
Additional data collected at the Moaza or Tehsil level can be used to generate more detailed estimates to help policymakers better locate poor pockets within districts.
Finally, there is a great need to generate more evidence on the effectiveness of different interventions in reducing poverty, it added.

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TWHRO strongly condemns the brutal killings of innocent people in Palestine by Israeli forces…

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We are working hard to discourage child labor in poor countries and want to stop this activity as soon as possible…..would you like to help TWHRO in this regard?

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